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The most important week since November?

The holidays, while quiet socially, still left us behind in many things like this blog. I did manage to finish the last (and most complicated) motet for the Isaac project planned by Markus Utz. Michelle has mostly recovered from pneumonia, but is worried that her voice may never be the same, as it retains a raspy nature. I worked extra hours at the store. And we discovered that we have a public dog park near us that allows us to let Loki run with other dogs and take long hikes on leash and so I have been doing that every day I do not work – consuming 2 hours.

Meanwhile, I have monitored the political scene as I always have. I recall posting on Facebook in 2015 warning about Trump’s neo-Nazi proclivities. What he has done since November is nothing short of attempting to overthrow the Constitution of the United States. Anyone who voted for this dangerous individual has to put themselves into the same camp as those who supported Hitler in the early 1930s.

I have not the ability like others to write with eloquence about the Georgia run-offs or the Congressional meeting on Wednesday, but I found this article on Mother Jones to express much of what I feel. Mike Pence represents the epitome of the hypocrites who have supported Trump and this article speaks volumes about him and those like him:

Cry About It, Mike Pence

If you don’t want to read the whole thing, I’ll quote some of it, hopefully not out of context.

Mike Pence is in distress. According to the New York Times, the vice president faces a personal and professional dilemma heading into Wednesday’s pro forma counting of the Electoral College vote in the Senate: "One person close to Mr. Pence described Wednesday’s duties as gut-wrenching, saying that he would need to balance the president’s misguided beliefs about government with his own years of preaching deference to the Constitution." “Gut-wrenching?” Oh my God, you poor thing. Is Mike Pence going to be okay? Does he need some Tylenol? A hot bath?

The vice president’s task here is easy: opening envelopes certifying the winner of an election in which one candidate won 74 more electoral votes and 7 million more popular votes than the other. It is an astonishingly straightforward task, like looking at the scoreboard and trying to determine if Alabama beat Notre Dame. There’s nothing especially unusual about this year’s election results, other than the fact that lots of people are pretending there is because the results made them sad.

.... because Trump is both stupid and deeply cynical, he has tried to overturn the election results in a slapstick but persistent fashion—sometimes by trying to stop the counting of votes and sometimes by imploring others to “find” votes and sometimes by trying to throw out whole batches of already-counted votes because they were not cast for him.

Again, anyone who voted for Trump the first time might be excused for believing in his mythic lies about himself – lies that are now obviously undone; the self-made man, the businessman with an ability to manage huge operations successfully. Anyone with any moral compass and a modicum of sense must now see him as a narcissistic megalomaniac whose only focus is himself. Thank God, some GOP personages (besides Mitt Romney) have finally found the personal integrity to say publicly that the emperor has no clothes. Shame on the sycophants and hypocrites that have not.

I hope both democrats in Georgia win. It will take a concerted effort and years to begin to undo the damage that Trump has done to our nation’s reputation, the climate, and simple social decency; and to begin to rebuild faith in our political system. I have stated before that I am a former registered Republican and only registered as Democrat when it became apparent to me that the GOP did not give a rat’s ass about running the country, only about winning the next election so they could maintain the status quo.

I remain a fiscal conservative while advocating for the disenfranchised, recognizing that demographics change, and embracing the diversity and cultural richness that makes the United States unique. The rich white folks need to share. Allow others into the country club.

Peace.

3 thoughts on “The most important week since November?

  1. Excellent concluding statement:
    I remain a fiscal conservative while advocating for the disenfranchised, recognizing that demographics change, and embracing the diversity and cultural richness that makes the United States unique. The rich white folks need to share. Allow others into the country club.
    Peace.

  2. I’m keeping my fingers crossed for the election, but I honestly have no idea how to undo the damage that Trump and his sycophants have done to our democracy.

    As we speak, Pennsylvania’s state senate is meeting with an empty chair, the Republican’s having ceased control from the governor during swearing in, because a Republican candidate is claiming their Democratic opponent didn’t actually win the election. They’re hoping, just as Trump did, they can get a court to overturn the result on one of the same grounds Trump tried to overturn Biden’s PA victory.

    I’m greatly concerned that this can never be put back in the box. That now, it will be up to judges to decide the outcomes of elections. And it’s clear from the actions throughout the country that we have too many Banana Republicans in positions of leadership.

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